How much is marketing time worth?

I ran some fresh calculations this morning, and our time is currently worth an average of $33/hr. per person. That includes salary, taxes, benefits, and overhead. Please use this number in your cost analysis and ROI calculations until further notice.

 

Also, let’s factor this number in with reference to the meetings we have. Here are ten suggestions how:

  1. Make sure the meeting is necessary and that the issue can’t be solved more efficiently (through an email, IM, phone call, or quick visit).
  2. Let people know in advance what the meeting is about so they can be prepared and make an informed decision about whether to attend.
  3. Keep the meeting length as short as possible.
  4. Be well prepared, especially if you’re leading the meeting.
  5. Start on time. Take charge, set the agenda, get down to business, and keep things on track and moving quickly.
  6. Invite only the people that need to be there (but don’t invite too few so that the meeting is wasted time).
  7. Give people the opportunity and freedom to be excused if they don’t need to be there. Asked to be excused if you don’t need to be there. Feel free to accept meetings as tentative or decline them.
  8. End meetings on time. If you’ve covered everything you need to cover, end the meeting early.
  9. For recurring meetings, make sure you’re not having them too frequently.
  10. Regularly audit your calendar to make sure you’re not suffering from meeting creep.

Thanks!

 

Phil

10 Ways to Optimize Meetings

Meetings can be great tools for collaboration, but they can also be expensive (currently $33/hr. per person) and a huge time suck. Here are ten ways you can optimize your meetings:
  1. Make sure the meeting is necessary and that the issue can’t be solved more efficiently (through an email, IM, phone call, or quick visit).
  2. Let people know in advance what the meeting is about so they can be prepared and make an informed decision about whether to attend.
  3. Keep the meeting length as short as possible.
  4. Be well prepared, especially if you’re leading the meeting.
  5. Start on time. Take charge, set the agenda, get down to business, and keep things on track and moving quickly.
  6. Invite only the people that need to be there (but don’t invite too few so that the meeting is wasted time).
  7. Give people the opportunity and freedom to be excused if they don’t need to be there. Asked to be excused if you don’t need to be there. Feel free to accept meetings as tentative or decline them.
  8. End meetings on time. If you’ve covered everything you need to cover, end the meeting early.
  9. For recurring meetings, make sure you’re not having them too frequently.
  10. Regularly audit your calendar to make sure you’re not suffering from meeting creep.

What suggestions do you have for making the most of meetings?

NEW: Project Status & Priority Levels

Hi Marketing Team,

We have a massive amount of work flowing through our department at any given time and the priorities change rapidly. Phil and Nathan have asked the marketing leads to make sure they are aware of every project that we’re working on. On a weekly basis the leadership team will be looking at all projects that have come into our department and will set priorities for them to make sure we’re all working on the most important projects.

This means that the Wiki is becoming even more important because it is the only place where we can see every project that is going on.

1)      Every project needs to have a Wiki page. Nathan has asked Design and MarTech to push back if there isn’t a Wiki associated with a project*

2)      We’re making some changes to the way we use the project status field on the Wiki

  1. Triage: every new project needs the status set to triage. Management will determine whether we need to do it now or later. The templates should all be set to triage. Please do not change this.
  2. Pending: once a project has been triaged, if Phil and Nathan want it to be worked on now, we’ll changed the status to pending, assign it to someone to own and assign a priority level.
  3. Active: once you start working on a project that has been assigned to you, you’ll need to change the status to Active. All active projects should have a priority level assigned to them.
  4. d.      OnHold: we will no longer be using this status
  5. Backlog: Backlog projects are ones that we have decided not to work on at this time. We will be changing these Wiki pages so that they are not assigned to owners, but are instead assigned to areas of ownership. When a backlogged project is ready to be worked on  it will move to pending (if no work has been done yet) or to active (if some work was done on it before it was backlogged).

3)      We’re adding priority level to every Active project on the Wiki: [[projectPriority::]]

1: On Fire

2: Do now

3: Do later

*We still differentiate between a task and a project.

  • Tasks: A task is something that needs to get done that is isolated to a single individual or a single “thing”. If something requires more than one individual to be involved, or has multiple steps, then it is not a task it is a project. Tasks can exist outside of projects. These do NOT require a Wiki.
  • Projects: A project is a collection of tasks. These require a Wiki.
  • Bugs: Things that are broken on websites, landing pages, in software, etc. These do NOT require a Wiki.

For webpage updates: If it is changing the design or structure of a page it is a project. If it is content it is a task.

Product Team: This change does not apply to sku Projects and Sermon Archive Projects.