Are You Sending Pain Killers or Vitamins?

Marketo has a neat article on email copy that addresses two approaches to email marketing:

  • Pain killer emails address problems a customer is experiencing and offer ways to overcome them.
  • Vitamin emails set customers up to avoid future problems and offer added benefits.

It makes you wonder:

  • Which approach should we take in Logos 5 upgrade messaging? 
  • Is the Faithlife Study Bible a pain killer or a vitamin? Both?
  • How about Noet? It’s a pain killer to those outside our current audience, but a vitamin to Logos users who just love the classics.

Next time you put together a marketing email, ask: does this audience need a pain killer or a vitamin?

 

Who are you targeting?

Creators: Pastor, church leaders, seminarians, etc. This group creates sermons, messages, papers, etc.

Consumers: Christian families, individuals who are not pastors/in seminary, but who are interested in studying the Bible at a deeper level.

Creators

Consumers

More Logical More Emotional
Want a seminary library at their fingertips (1,076 resources!) Want their questions answered (this answers my question about marriage!)
Easily recognize the value:It’s for pastors! It’s for me! Need to be shown the value:It’s for pastors. Why buy it?
Need to be shown how to use it to prepare messages (e.g. prepare a sermon) Need to be shown how to use it to answer questions (e.g. what does the Bible say about dating?)
Bible Study Tools for Pastors video Bible Study Tools for Families video

Who is your target audience?

Who are you Targeting?

 

Nathan recently shared the blog post Sell More by Selling Differently. The blog’s author argued that to sell most effectively we must remember that customers are all different, and that their needs are often quite different as well. The author used LEGO as an example.

Three ten-year-old boys might buy the same exact set of LEGO blocks in the same store for the same price, but for three completely different reasons: constructing, role playing, and creating.

I would like to apply this same logic to Logos (courtesy of a conversation I had with Bill Nienhaus). While there are many ways we can slice and dice Logos’ customers into groups, I would like to argue that most of them can fit into one of two major categories: Creators and Consumers.

Creators: This group is composed of pastor, church leaders, and seminarians. They create sermons, messages, and papers.

Consumers: This group is composed of christian families and individuals who are interested in studying the Bible at a deep level. They consume biblical material to enrich their lives and answer their questions.

Similar to how three 10-year-old boys may purchase a set of Legos for different reasons, a 40-year-old pastor will likely purchase a base package for different reasons than a 40-year-old accountant who has two kids:

Creators

Consumers

More Logical More Emotional
Want a seminary library at their fingertips (1,076 resources!) Want their questions answered (this answers my question about marriage!)
Easily recognize the value: It’s for pastors! It’s for me! Need to be shown the value: It’s for pastors. Why buy it?
Need to be shown how to use it to prepare messages (e.g. prepare a sermon) Need to be shown how to use it to answer questions (e.g. what does the Bible say about dating?)
Bible Study Tools for Pastors video Bible Study Tools for Families video

Who is your target audience?

 

Crafting Messages: I recently saw a Logos affiliate page for Harvest that reads: “Logos 5’s smart tools connect you to the Word. You can explore your Bibles and theological library, dig into original languages, craft powerful messages, and conduct scholarly research.” I don’t know who the “Harvest” audience is, but I sure hope the audience is full of creators! When working on strategy or messaging consider if your target audience is primarily consumers, creators or both.

Headlines: The promotions team often uses “Dig Deeper” and “Connect to the Word” in headlines. Interestingly, they apply to both audiences, but for different reasons. Can you make the headline and message specific to your target audience’s desires and needs?

Read & Discuss: Sell More by Selling Differently

I like the premise of this article (especially the part about how marketing is about changing behavior!) and thought it would be a great conversation starter.

Read this.

Answer this: “How would you categorize YOUR company’s business or consumer customers in terms of their different needs?”

Why targeting is awesome–with squids

From: Laura Converse
To: Promotion Team; Marketing Leads; Email Marketing Team

Hi Team,

With the huge variety of emails we’re getting out the door, we need to all be thinking strategically about how to get the right message to the right people.

We have some amazing targeting capabilities with our rules engine, and this can dramatically improve how we do email.

Let’s use an example.

Say we have a sweet discount on squids.  We set a goal  to get 100 people buy one via emails.

We might try to tell 100,000 people about it, hoping that 100 of them buy.  But what if we could find the right people? We might only have to ask 200 of them to get those squids sold.

Here are some of the options we have with email:

  • Chances are, there are 100 people on the NewsWire list willing to buy a squid. We can send an email to the NewsWire list, hoping to get 100 bites out of almost 600,000 people.
    • Pro: This is a lot of people.  We’re really getting the word out about squids.
    • Con: What about all the people on the list who don’t care about squids at all, or worse yet, hate squids? Or what if they already own a squid, and we’re just sending them an offer they can’t use?  By sending them this email, we encourage them to unsubscribe.
    • Let’s narrow down, then. We can send an email out to the Ocean Studies Special Offers list. It’s a much smaller list, but chances are, people who sign up to that list will probably be interested.
      • Pro:  People on this list really do want the good deals of the sea, and this is a great one.  Maybe a squid will be their first purchase from us, and we’ll be able to bring them into our ecosystem!
      • Con: Still the same con: there might be people on this list who are not exactly squid fans, or they are, but they already bought a squid at full price.  And, the list is much smaller than the NewsWire, so we’re not even going to have sheer quantity going for us like we would have with the NewsWire list.
      • If we want to make sure we get only the right people in the know, we can (and should) create a BusinessDesk rule.
        • We could include these groups:
          • Everyone who owns an octopus, a sperm whale,  a lobster, or even a starfish
          • Everyone who has squids on their wish list
          • Everyone who has squid reference materials
          • Everyone who once canceled a preorder or abandoned a cart with a squid in it
  • We could exclude these groups:
    • Everyone who already has a squid
    • Everyone who has purchased the anti-squid handbook
  • Then, we can sync this rule to any email list.

Remember: there are always people who won’t be interested in your email.  If we can figure out who they are and cut them from our recipient pool, we’re keeping people subscribed who will later be interested in another offer.

If you want to know more about targeting, please feel free to ask me about it.  It’s a really exciting thing we can do to make our efforts pay off even more.

Laura Converse, Email Marketing Team Lead